http://newamerica-now.blogspot.com/2014/04/us-land-claims-in-bundy-case-based-on.html

Guest Post by Carl Herman
“The only thing new in the world is the history you don’t know.”  - President Harry Truman, Plain Speaking: An Oral Biography of Harry S. Truman (1974), Merle Miller, pg. 26.
The Bundy land case raises questions of US federal authority on the ~80% of Nevada they claim to “own.” It’s also a spark for Americans to act on a local issue within a context of US government “leaders” engaging in OBVIOUS crimes centering in war, money, and media (also in ~100 other crucial areas).

US land claims (and here) in Nevada and throughout the US Southwest originate in similar crimes to current US lie-started, treaty-violating, unlawful Wars of Aggression. These claims are from violating treaties with Native Americans, and a lie-started, treaty-violating, unlawful invasive war on Mexico.
If the land in question was stolen by the US federal government, and used US military to do so only with unlawful orders and lies to our trusting soldiers and families, then we have strong arguments that all ensuing claims of the federal government are void because anything passed as so-called “law” in obvious violation to the US Constitution is void with zero legal force.

US land claims on this stolen land are closer to the argument, “All land is the King’s land” than comprehensively truthful public consideration of what is and is not in the public’s best interests under a representative democratic republic of limited government under the US Constitution. US key policies are also far closer to fascism than a republic limited under law.

And that said, again, the big picture action is to arrest US “leadership” from more obvious crimes and lies in the present in war, money, and media (plus ~100 other crucial areas)

The Mexican-American War  is vitally important to understand because it sets the precedent of a US president lying, violating clear treaty, and the US stealing resources at the expense of thousands of deaths of US soldiers, and many multiples of those deaths of the people we attacked. Then, as today, the majority of Americans believed their “leaders” in ignorance of the facts, and without media’s coverage of clear voices like Abraham Lincoln’s to explain the facts.

The US invaded Mexico in 1846 despite it being a clear treaty violation and upon clear lies of US President Polk: “ American blood shed upon the American soil.” The result of the war was the US taking 40% of Mexico’s land. Although historians note that freshman member of Congress Abraham Lincoln was/is correct that the president lied and violated a treaty with criminal complicity of Congress, both parties’ and media propaganda allowed the war to move forward without criminal prosecution. The House of Representatives had enough votes to censure the president for, “a war unnecessarily and unconstitutionally begun by the President of the United States,” but not to impeach. Importantly, I’m unaware of any historian’s rational challenge to this history, despite the lies of omission you’ll read in corporate media textbooks today.
But don’t believe any expert or me; use your critical thinking skills. This is as easy as our baseball rule analogy that when a person knows the rule when a runner is safe or out at first base, there’s no need to ask anyone. If you know that:
a treaty is defined in Article Six of the US Constitution as the “Supreme Law of the Land,”
the US had the Adams-Onís Treaty with Mexico (originally with Spain and formally transferred to Mexico in 1831) in crystal-clear language regarding the areas of the now Southwest US (including Texas with all the “border dispute” lands because the Sabine River between Louisiana and today’s Texas was the agreed border):  “The two high contracting parties agree to cede and renounce all their rights, claims, and pretensions to the territories described by the said line, that is to say: The United States hereby cede to His Catholic Majesty, and renounce forever, all their rights, claims, and pretensions, to the territories lying west and south of the above-described line; and, in like manner, His Catholic Majesty cedes to the said United States all his rights, claims, and pretensions to any territories east and north of the said line, and for himself, his heirs, and successors, renounces all claim to the said territories forever.”
Therefore, the US Supreme Law was to forever recognize Texas and the now Southwest as Mexico’s land.
In baseball, you can (and do) say, “I know where first base is. I know when a runner is clearly safe or out at first base.” In this “current event” of life and death from our past, you can and should say, “I know what a treaty means. I know what a border means. I know when the US is 400 miles over the border that was defined in a treaty that they’re obviously into Mexico and not on American soil.” You may even artistically add, “Duh.”
Abraham Lincoln recognized claimed “reasons” for a “defensive war” against Mexico were obvious lies when inspected. Lincoln’s speech as a Member in the House of Representatives:
“I carefully examined the President’s messages, to ascertain what he himself had said and proved upon the point. The result of this examination was to make the impression, that taking for true, all the President states as facts, he falls far short of proving his justification; and that the President would have gone farther with his proof, if it had not been for the small matter, that the truth would not permit him… Now I propose to try to show, that the whole of this, — issue and evidence — is, from beginning to end, the sheerest deception.”
And Lincoln in a letter to his law partner:
“Allow the President to invade a neighboring nation whenever he shall deem it necessary to repel an invasion, and you allow him to do so whenever he may choose to say he deems it necessary for such purpose, and you allow him to make war at pleasure. Study to see if you can fix any limit to his power in this respect, after having given him so much as you propose. If to-day he should choose to say he thinks it necessary to invade Canada to prevent the British from invading us, how could you stop him? You may say to him, — “I see no probability of the British invading us”; but he will say to you, “Be silent: I see it, if you don’t.””
I invite you to read Lincoln’s “ Spot Resolutions” for yourself to explain, document, and prove the US president of his day lying and leading an unlawful war for resources as an example of why Lincoln is considered to be one of the most brilliant writers in American history. If passed, Congress would have demanded President Polk to come before them and respond to Lincoln’s questions.
Henry David Thoreau refused to pay his taxes to support the unlawful war, and was jailed. Despite Lincoln having all the facts on his side, because the president, majority of Congress, and majority of the press wanted this war as an expression of the racist “ Manifest Destiny,” Lincoln didn’t have the votes to pass the Spot Resolutions. In fact, Lincoln was called “unpatriotic” and “Spotty” in derision by both parties’ “leadership” and the press.
Lincoln became so unpopular from these intentional lies and propaganda that he had no chance for re-election.
The war killed over 50,000 Mexicans and over 5,000 Americans, and is a clear historical precedent for US “leadership” to choose lies, dictatorship, and War of Aggression rather than truth, limited government under the law, and peace. In addition, the concluding Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo under Article VIII stated property ownership remained under those current owners. The long history from then to US “ownership” claims today I’m sure has abundant hypocrisy and crimes.
Although this history of the Mexican-American War is uncontroversially factual and as far as I’m aware undisputed among professional historians, corporate media-published high school textbooks will only state that the causes of war were a “border dispute” and repeat President Polk’s claims that Mexico invaded the US with “American blood shed on American soil.”
This is a massive lie of omission and commission to not communicate at least the preceding few paragraphs.
If history texts explained that a US President was the war-mongering liar that Lincoln explained in his speech and documented in the Spot Resolutions, and that Congress voted in criminal complicity to shred a US treaty, lie to the American public about who invaded whom, and be guilty of war-murdering tens of thousands of human beings, would you look at current US wars from the benefit of that accurate history?
“At first blush, a man is not capable of reporting truth; he must be drenched and saturated with it first.”       – Henry David Thoreau, I to myself: an annotated selection from the journal of Henry D. Thoreau, 1837. Thoreau, like Abraham Lincoln, recognized claimed “reasons” for a “defensive war” against Mexico were obvious lies when inspected.
Perhaps this famous quote makes better sense now:
“Progress, far from consisting in change, depends on retentiveness. When change is absolute there remains no being to improve and no direction is set for possible improvement: and when experience is not retained, as among savages, infancy is perpetual. Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it.”
  – George Santayana, The Life of Reason, Vol. 1.
 

 

 

 

Valid till 2020 – Malwarebytes pro key

 

From: http://myatus.com/p/poor-mans-proxmox-cluster/


 

Networking I had written this elsewhere before, but thought I would share it on my own site as well. The idea here is to create a Proxmox VE cluster with limited resources, in particular a lack of a private network / VLAN. We address this by creating a virtual private network using a lightweight VPN provider, namely Tinc.

You could use something else, like OpenVPN or IPSEC. The former is a bit on the heavy side for the task, whilst the latter may not have all the features we need. Specifically, Tinc allows us to create an auto-meshing network, packet switching and use multicast. Multicast will be needed to create a Proxmox VE cluster, whilst the virtual switching ensures packets will eventually be routed to the right server and VM.

 

Create an additional vmbr

By default there should already be a vmbr0 bridge for Proxmox.  We will need to create – or modify – an additional vmbr, which in this example we name vmbr1.

 

Warning: on many systems, vmbr0 bridge is used to make your server accessible over the public network – so do not edit that unless absolutely required!

You also need to think of what private IP block you would like to use, and assign each Proxmox VE server an IP from within that private IP block. For example, I use the IP range 192.168.14.0/23 (which is 192.168.14.1-192.168.15.254 and a netmask of 255.255.254.0). The 192.168.15.x range I assign to the Proxmox VE servers, whereas the 192.168.14.x range I assign to containers / VMs. Using that IP range, you would change the /etc/network/interfaces file as following:

You can force the changes using:

You will need to do this on each server, taking care to select a different IP address. Keep it simple, start at 192.168.15.1, and increment the last number for each new server.

Tinc

The next step would be installing Tinc and configuring it in such a way that Proxmox VE can use multicast over that virtual private network.

So on the server, install Tinc with:

Next, create a directory where the configuration for the VPN will reside (you can have multiple configurations as such):

Next, we create a basic configuration, which tells Tinc to use a “switch” mode and what this server’s “name” is. For sake of simplicity, use the hostname for the “name” (use uname -n to determine it):

The “ConnectTo” is currently left blank, but will be important once you have setup the other servers.  More on this later.

Then we create a server-specific configuration. Note that the filename is the same as specified in “Name =” above.

Obviously you should replace the “Address” line with the actual public IP address of your server.

Now we need to create a public/private key. The private key will remain exactly that: private. The public key will be appended to the file we just created (/etc/tinc/vpn/hosts/server1), which will eventually be distributed to the other servers.

It will ask you to confirm two file locations. The default should be correct (with the last/2nd one the file as mentioned above).

Now we need an up/down script, to do some post configuration of the network when the VPN comes up (or goes away). This is a simple copy & paste, provided you have setup vmbr1 as outlined earlier:

What the above does, is add the VPN tunnel to the vmbr1 bridge. Furthermore, it allows multicast messages over vmbr1. It also sets the use of masquerading, to allow a VM on a private IP to communicate successfully with the outside world – it will use the IP address of vmbr0 to do so.

Then, you need to tell Tinc that the contents in the “vpn” sub-directory should be started whenever it starts:

You will need to do this on each server that needs to be part of the VPN. In addition, the files within the directory /etc/tinc/vpn/hosts/ needs to be distributed to all servers (so that all servers have the files from the other servers). Its simple enough to script this, if you want to go that route, but that’s beyond the scope here.

As mentioned earlier, you will need to edit the /etc/tinc/vpn/tinc.conf and provide the name of another server in the “ConnectTo” setting that was previously left blank.  Which server you chose is entirely up to you, and you could chose a different one for each server – remember that Tinc is auto-meshing, so it will connect all servers over time.

Note: without making that change to /etc/tinc/vpn/tinc.conf, Tinc will not know what to do so you will not have a working VPN as a result.

Once you have edited the configuration as outlined, (re)start Tinc using the following command:

And test your network by pinging another node on its private IP, ie:

Note I use the “-c3″ here, to limit the amount of pings. If the VPN was not configured correctly, or a firewall is interfering, you may otherwise end up with a large number of “Host or destination is unreachable” errors.

Forcing the private IP address

We need to force Proxmox VE, or more specifically Corosync, to use the private IP addresses rather than the public IP address.  This because the multicast needs to be done over our virtual private network.

The easiest, but also the “dirtiest” method is to simply change the /etc/hosts, which I will outline here.

The first step is to ensure that the /etc/hosts file is read before attempting to do a full DNS lookup:

Next edit the /etc/hosts file, by commenting out the original line, and adding our own:

Make sure that the private IP address matches the one you assigned to vmbr1 (double check with ifconfig vmbr1).

Again, this is a “dirty” method and you may want to use your own DNS server instead that resolves IPs for a local network (say, “server1.servers.localnet”).

At this stage, reboot the server to ensure the changes get picked up and everything works as expected (that is, your server comes back up online – hmm!).

Create the cluster

If you do not yet have a cluster configured, you need to create one first. So pick a particular server that you would like to consider as a “main server” and perform the following:

Where <arbitrary-name> is something of your own choosing. Keep the name short and simple, without spaces or other funny characters.

The “main server” is a loose term really, as any server within the cluster can manage other servers. But use it as a consistent starting point for adding other servers to the cluster.

You can check if things are working correctly with:

In particular, you’d want to make sure that the “Node addresses:” portion is the private IP address as on vmbr1.

Adding servers to the cluster

Adding a server (node) to the cluster will need a little preparation. Specifically, because we use private IP addresses for the cluster, we need to force other nodes to do the same when trying to contact another node. In other words, if server1 wants to contact server2, it should use the 192.x range instead of the public IP address.

So, based on the above example, on server1 we need to add a line to the /etc/hosts like this:

Note the double “>>” brackets. If you use a single “>” one, you overwrite the entire file with just that line. You’ve been warned.

And on server2, we need to make sure server1 can be contacted using its private IP as well, so on that server, we perform:

All of this can be made much fancier with your own DNS server and bindings, but again, this is beyond the scope and goes on the assumption you don’t mind doing this for the 2, 5 or 10 servers or so you may have. If you have a few hundred, then I wouldn’t expect you to be looking at a “Poor Man’s” setup.

On the server that you will be adding to the cluster, make sure that you can successfully ping that private IP address of the “main server”.

If tested OK, then still on that server (thus the one that isn’t yet part of the cluster), type:

Where “server1″ is the “main server” (the one on which you first created the cluster). It will ask you for the root password for SSH for server1, and then does its thing with configuration.

Note: If you have disabled password-based root logins using SSH, you may have to temporarily enable it. Using SSH keys would be a preferred method over passwords.

After this has been done, the node should automatically on your web-based GUI and can be verified from the CLI using:

If the nodes show up in the “pvecm nodes” command and GUI, then you have successfully created the cluster.

Note: A note about a 2-node cluster and quorum can be found here.

Containers and VMs

You can now create containers and VMs that can be migrated between the nodes.

You can either assign the private IP address directly (venet, only on OpenVZ containers) or as a network device (veth) attached to vmbr1.

The private IP address should be within the range of your specified netmask on vmbr1. So going by the above example of using 192.168.14.0/23, that’s anything between 192.168.14.1 and 192.168.15.254. Make sure the IP isn’t already used by another VM or a node (see initial notes, re 192.168.14.x for VMs).

If you fire up the VM, its private IP address should be ping-able from any server, and from within the container / VM, you can ping any private as well as public IP address (the latter thanks to masquerading configured with the tinc-up script). If this is not the case, the network configuration was not done correctly.

Final notes

You should now have at least one container / VM with a private IP address. Its good and well if this VM doesn’t need to be accessed from the outside world, but if you want to give it such access, you will need to use NAT on the server. This will instruct the node that incoming traffic on a particular port will need to be forwarded to a particular VM.

For example, TCP port 25 on 123.4.5.6 is forwarded to VM on IP 192.168.14.1:

Note that this is just a simple guide to help you get started. More importantly, it doesn’t include any basic security measures such as a firewall (there are other articles about a firewall for Proxmox on this site [here and here], which I will update when I can).

 

From: http://www.gavinchappell.co.uk/2013/10/23/virtualbox-with-bridged-networking-on-windows-8-1-upgraded-from-8-0-via-the-windows-store/


After upgrading to Windows 8.1 Pro from the Windows Store, I found that my VirtualBox VMs using bridged networking were no longer able to run. All the physical NICs had disappeared from my bridged adapter list in the VirtualBox Manager. To restore them:

  • Open Network and Sharing Center
  • Change Adapter Settings
  • Open “Properties…” of the physical adapter you need to bridge to
  • Click “Install…”
  • Choose “Service”
  • Install the “VirtualBox Bridged Networking Driver”
  • If prompted for a directory to install from, it’s “drivers\network\netflt” inside the folder VirtualBox is installed (e.g. C:\Program Files\Oracle\VirtualBox\drivers\network\netflt)

No reboot is required, although the network connection will drop. This also seemed to install the service for all NICs, including the TAP virtual NIC I have installed on my computer.