It started as a media industry murmur, but now it’s official: the New York Times, the most popular online newspaper in the U.S., will begin charging for access to its web site content after readers visit an as yet undetermined number of articles per month. Paid print subscribers will not be charged for online articles. The pricing, exact timing, and content allowances haven’t been set yet, but expect to see other news organizations watch closely, and possibly follow the Times’ lead. Would a charge on volume reading lead you back to your search engine to get your news, or would you consider paying under the Times’ planned “freemium” model? [New York Times]







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adeelarshad82 writes “Bowing to pressure from the EU, Microsoft said it would discard all data collected via its Bing search engine after six months. (Microsoft’s announcement contains a timeline for what data gets anonymized or deleted when.) Until now, the software giant has retained the data for 18 months. Over the past two years, however, Internet companies such as Microsoft, Yahoo, and Google have made efforts to reduce the amount of time that information is stored. Microsoft’s policies will remain the same, but now, the company will delete the IP address and other info after six months. Back in December 2008, Microsoft said it would reduce its retention time to six months, but only if its rivals followed suit. At the time, Yahoo anonymized its data after 13 months, and Google did the same after 9 months. A week later, Yahoo cut that time down to three months, but Google said its decisions are not conditioned on what competitors do.”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.


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