Talking Dinner Plate Tells You to Slow Down, Fatty [Health]

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Pretty cool idea: This Mandometer plate has a scale underneath which measures how fast weight (food) is disappearing, and compares it to a pre-set rate of consumption. If you eat too fast, it’ll actually speak up to admonish you.

As embarrassing as it’d be to actually own this thing, its heart is in the right place: If you slow down your chomping, your body will register as “full” and you’ll eat less. I’m not going to buy one—I don’t need some uppity plate telling me that no human being should eat an entire San Francisco burrito in seven minutes—but I appreciate the effort. [My Digital Life via Boing Boing]






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Why “Running IT As a Business” Is a Bad Idea

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snydeq sends along a provocative piece from Infoworld, arguing that the conventional wisdom on how IT should be run is all wrong. “Bob Lewis dispels the familiar litany that ‘IT should be run as a business,’ instead offering insights into what he is calling a ‘guerilla movement’ to reject conventional ‘IT wisdom’ and industry punditry in favor of what experience tells you will work in real organizations. ‘When IT is a business, selling to its “internal customers,” its principal product is software that “meets requirements.” This all but ensures a less-than-optimal solution, lack of business ownership, and poor acceptance of the results,’ Lewis writes. ‘The alternatives begin with a radically different model of the relationship between IT and the rest of the business — that IT must be integrated into the heart of the enterprise, and everyone in IT must collaborate as a peer with those in the business who need what they do.’ To do otherwise is a sure sign of numbered days for IT, according to Lewis. After all, the standard ‘run IT as a business’ model had its origins in the IT outsourcing industry, ‘which has a vested interest in encouraging internal IT to eliminate everything that makes it more attractive than outside service providers.'”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.


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Discussion [Five Surgeons are discussing who makes the best patients to operate on.]

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Five Surgeons are discussing who makes the best
patients to operate on.
The first surgeon says, “I like to see

accountants

on
my operating table, because when you open them

up,

everything inside is numbered.”

The second responds, “Yeah, but you should try
electricians! Everything inside them is color
coded.”

The third surgeon says, “No, I really think
librarians
are the best; everything inside them is in
alphabetical order.”

The fourth surgeon chimes in: “You know, I like
construction workers…those guys always
understand
when you have a few parts left over.”

But the fifth surgeon shut them all up when he
observed: “You’re all wrong. Politicians are the
easiest to operate on. There’s no guts, no

heart,

no
balls, no brains and no spine, and the head and
the
ass are interchangeable.”

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