Multiple Instances of Dropbox on Ubuntu Jaunty

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I used this technique to run two dropbox daemons at the same time. I have one dropbox for data and a separate one for portable applications I use on a USB stick when I’m forced to use Windows. I run two instances of dropbox on the USB stick already, but wanted to keep a copy of the portableapps dropbox on my Ubuntu machine as well. Keeping the two dropboxen separate means I have more control over when the two data stores are updated.

Run the following command in a terminal:

This should start the dropbox installer. In the wizard, you can create a new account or link to an existing one. “.dropbox-alt” is the directory where I want the installer to download the new instance — you can choose a different location for the actual dropbox sync folder during the installation. Note that the .dropbox and .dropbox-dist folders will still be created inside the .dropbox-alt folder, so don’t panic if it looks empty.

I haven’t tried it, but I presume this method should work for as many instances as necessary.

I don’t want my second dropbox to run automatically, so I can start it up when I want it with the same command without the “-i” (which runs the installer):

HOME=$HOME/.dropbox-alt /usr/bin/dropbox start

The dropbox wiki suggests adding this line to /etc/rc.local in order to run the dropbox daemon at startup (replace “username” with the actual user):

su username -c “/home/username/.dropbox-alt/.dropbox-dist/dropboxd &”

UPDATE: I tried the previous command and it doesn’t seem to work. I’m trying this instead:

su username -c “HOME=$HOME/.dropbox-alt /usr/bin/dropbox start”

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How To Upgrade From Fedora 15 To Fedora 16 or 17 (Desktop & Server)

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From: http://www.howtoforge.com/how-to-upgrade-from-fedora-15-to-fedora-16-desktop-and-server


How To Upgrade From Fedora 15 To Fedora 16 or 17 (Desktop & Server)

Version 1.0
Author: Falko Timme
Follow me on Twitter
Last edited 11/08/2011

This article describes how you can upgrade your Fedora 15 system to Fedora 16. The upgrade procedure works for both desktop and server installations.

I do not issue any guarantee that this will work for you!

1 Preliminary Note
The commands in this article must be executed with root privileges. Open a terminal (on a Fedora 15 desktop, go to Applications > System Tools > Terminal) and log in as root, or if you log in with a regular user, type

su

to become root.

Please make sure that the system that you want to upgrade has more than 600 MB of RAM – otherwise the system might hang when it tries to reboot with the following message (leaving you with an unusable system):

Trying to unpack rootfs image as initramfs…

2 Upgrading To Fedora 16 (Desktop)
First we must upgrade the rpm package:

yum update rpm

Then we install the latest updates:

yum -y update

Next we clean the yum cache:

yum clean all

If you notice that a new kernel got installed during yum -y update, you should reboot the system now:

reboot

(After the reboot, log in as root again, either directly or with the help of

su

)

Now we come to the upgrade process. We can do this with preupgrade (preupgrade will also take care of your RPMFusion packages).

Install preupgrade…

yum install preupgrade

… and call it like this:

preupgrade

The preupgrade wizard will then start on your desktop. Select Fedora 16 (Verne). Afterwards the system is being prepared for the upgrade.

At the end, click on the Reboot Now button.

During the reboot, the upgrade is being performed. This can take quite a long time, so please be patient.

Afterwards, you can log into your new Fedora 16 desktop.

3 Upgrading To Fedora 16 (Server)
First we must upgrade the rpm package:

yum update rpm

Then we install the latest updates:

yum -y update

Next we clean the yum cache:

yum clean all

If you notice that a new kernel got installed during yum -y update, you should reboot the system now:

reboot

(After the reboot, log in as root again, either directly or with the help of

su

)

Now we come to the upgrade process. We can do this with preupgrade.

Install preupgrade…

yum install preupgrade

… and call it like this:

preupgrade-cli

It will show you a list of releases that you can upgrade to. If all goes well, it should show something like Fedora 16 (Verne) in the list:

[root@server1 ~]# preupgrade-cli
Loaded plugins: blacklist, langpacks, whiteout
No plugin match for: rpm-warm-cache
No plugin match for: remove-with-leaves
No plugin match for: auto-update-debuginfo
Loaded plugins: langpacks, presto, refresh-packagekit
please give a release to try to pre-upgrade to
valid entries include:
“Fedora 16 (Verne)”
[root@server1 ~]#

To upgrade, append the release string to the preupgrade-cli command:

preupgrade-cli “Fedora 16 (Verne)”

Preupgrade will also take care of your RPMFusion packages, so all you have to do after preupgrade has finished is to reboot:

reboot

During the reboot, the upgrade is being performed. This can take quite a long time, so please be patient. Afterwards, you can log into your new Fedora 16 server.

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Access multiple Google Calendars from KOrganizer

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From:

Access multiple Google Calendars from KOrganizer
Posted on June 11, 2011
Recently, a question came up on the KDE Community Forums regarding the use of multiple Google Calendars with KOrganizer. The preferred access up to now has been with googledata Akonadi resource, however that doesn’t support more than one calendar, and (at least from my unscientific observation) seems to be rather unmaintained these days.

Luckily, not all’s lost. Akonadi recently gained the opportunity of accessing CalDAV resources, and Google Calendar also offers a CalDAV interface, hence this is possible.
This post will briefly describe how (thanks go to PIMster krop, which casually mentioned the possibility on IRC and prompted me to investigate).

Notice: I am running trunk (4.7) so I have no idea if the steps posted below are possible in 4.6. Also, this worked for me with my particular setup. YMMV.
First of all, you need to obtain the calendar IDs you want to use. This is done in the web version of Google Organizer, in the settings page of your specific calendar, near the private links: it’s a string of alphanumeric characters followed by @gmail.com. Copy it in full (even the address part) as you will need it later, and do it for every calendar you want to use.
Next, open KOrganizer, locate the list of the calendars, right click on an emtpy spot and select Add Calendar:

In the next screen, select “DAV Groupware resource”, then a wizard will come up. Fill in username and password (apologies for the language! I haven’t found a quick way to switch these dialogs to English) and click on Next:

In the following screen, choose Configure the resource manually:

Click on Finish, but you’re not finished yet. In fact, we will have to add more stuff here. In the new window, select the display name (here shown as Nome visualizzato) of the calendar, then click on Add (which is translated as Aggiungi in this screen):

In the next screen we’ll have to add what’s needed for our calendar to work. In Remote URL put https://www.google.com/calendar/dav/YOURCALENDARID/events (https, not http) then put (again) your Google account credentials in the relevant places. Then click on “Download” (Scarica here) and you will see (after a while) your Calendar being loaded in the “Found collections” pane, with the name you set in Google Calendar. Click OK to save the configuration.

This will bring you back to the previous window. For more calendars, repeat the steps (click on Add, insert URL, Download, OK) for all the calendars you have to display.
That’s it. If you encounter trouble, have a look at ~/.xsession-errors to see whether Akonadi managed to connect and download your existing items correctly. And don’t forget to file bugs!

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